Colorado Springs, Colorado

Window To The Rockies

Colorado has always been a good place to find what you’re made of. — Senator John Hickenlooper

The Best Thing About Colorado Springs?

Proximity to the Rocky Mountains

Whoever coined “the great outdoors” may have been talking about Colorado Springs. Nestled at the foot of the Great Rocky Mountains, the city stays humble to its roots as a resort town giving tourists and residents alike an incredible natural palette within which to frolic. Residents can marvel at the incredible rock formations at the Gardens of the Gods and the 14,000-foot Pike’s Peak. It’s called “Little London” because so many immigrants from England moved here in the 1900’s but more importantly in 2018, US News & World Report named it the most desirable place to live in the United States.

Local POV:
The best part of living here is being adjacent to the outdoors. If you like hiking/biking or getting away into the mountains then it's a great place. The air is relatively clean here (though it's getting worse).

The Worst Thing About Colorado Springs?

The air

The weather is so perfect for hikers, skiers and those who appreciate natural beauty, but it’s murder on those who are sensitive to high, altering altitudes and dry climates. It’s so dry, in fact, that one should definitely test it out before moving here.

Local's advice:
Drink lots of water. I drink probably about a glass or two more of water per day than when I am in the midwest.Lotion and lip balm are musts.Humidifiers help, but it can take a few days to bring up the humidity of a room and home.

Eventually, your body will adapt some, but I still end up drinking quite a bit more water in Denver than when I travel to more humid locations. With the higher altitude, you breathe a little deeper and expel more moisture, then on top of that Denver has dry air. So both will dehydrate you.

Lifestyle In Colorado Springs

While there is a downtown area in Colorado Springs, and plenty of people enjoy going out here, the lifestyle most notable is built around the outdoors. The mountains, rivers and thousands of trails and foothills means hiking, biking, skiing, snowboarding, fishing, rock climbing, camping and just living in the shadow of Pikes Peak and a short drive to the Rockies is central to the adventurous spirit of those who live here. Moving here for the bars and restaurants and growing cultural scene seems to miss the point (although good to know they’re available). Take advantage of those for sure, but move here for the rest of it.

If you want to see what locals get up to during the year then check out the Colorado Springs calendar of events: https://www.coloradosprings.com/events/#!/

Workstyle In Colorado Springs

Colorado Springs was recently cited by Brookings as the fastest growing city for Millennials in the country. There are plenty of reasons for this growth but one of them is that it is rated by a Thumbtack annual survey as the fourth most business-friendly city in the country. The largest local employer base is the military and defense industry. In particular the military industry is focused on space and missile defense and so the aerospace industry is a high flyer here. The high-tech and tourism industries are also prominent, with manufacturing of electronics components a core piece of that employment base. Many of those manufacturing jobs are shifting overseas and the service industry is taking over some of that for job opportunities.
The Springs is also home to the US Olympic Training Center and 24 different national federations for Olympic Sports. This heavy sports influence reinforces the health, fitness and outdoor lifestyle culture of the area.

Why You Should Move Here Now?

It's Decent

Colorado Springs offers a decent life. It’s relatively safe, has highly rated schools and provides a degree of comfort from the rest of the world. The weather is fairly mild and schools are good. If you are conservative or politically independent you will feel at home. While more progressives are moving into the area to escape the costs of west and east coast cities it remains a more conservative choice than Denver or Boulder.